A day in the life of an eLearning developer

 

Emilia Bastiani elearning developer

Full Name: Emilia Faye Bastiani

Role: eLearning Developer

What did you do before you joined Day One Technologies?

Before joining Day One Technologies, I was a full-time student at the University of Leeds, studying English literature and Film Studies.

What’s the first thing you do when you get into the office?

The first thing I usually do is make myself a cup of tea, and look over notes I have made the previous day to see what I should be continuing/starting to work on. As well as this, I’ll open Slack to see if anyone has assigned me any work to do. Following this I’ll roughly plan the day’s, and if need be the week’s, workload.

What does your typical day involve?

My typical day usually involves building storyboarded material on Articulate Storyline, or amending and reviewing work within the modules that have already been built. In the past, my usual day has consisted of a more even balance, between storyboarding content from written briefs, and building content. When needed, I am also involved in the internal reviewing process that these storyboards go through, before being built in Storyline.

What’s the most challenging part of your role?

When you get a brief or a storyboard that features an element which you don’t necessarily know how to execute right off the top of your head (like an interaction or activity), the work process can be very ‘trial and error’. The challenge with this is to either find a way to overcome the problems you run into, or adapt what is in the brief or storyboard to develop a satisfactory and equally effective alternative.

However, encountering these kinds of challenges only has positive outcomes. It’s allowed me to gain a strong understanding and knowledge of the building process and the programmes we use; as well as allowing me to offer my own creative input where necessary.

What does an elearning developer do

What do you love most about working in eLearning?

Often, there’s plenty of variety with the work I can be doing. Different projects always require a different understanding of the content and brand aesthetic etc., and I really like getting to grips with that when my role requires it. I also think a really exciting thing about working in eLearning more generally, is that there’s never only one way to do something.

This also extends to the way in which different people utilise the programmes we use to build. Working with different people in the office, I have learnt a great deal about effective techniques and methods that I have been able to apply. Furthermore, as an industry, eLearning is limitless in terms of the ways we can effectively implement eLearning material; both psychologically and technologically.

What would be your one piece of advice for anyone wanting to get into eLearning?

Be open minded and be receptive. Ask questions so that you can learn to do things for yourself, and actively work towards making yourself a valuable asset. Furthermore, be confident in sharing your own ideas and implement that into your work where appropriate.